DTL Fleischmann Roman Text regular lowercase

The lowercase 'a' is a double story 'a'. The left side of the vertical right stroke is vertical but the right side of the bold line is slightly angled. It is slightly going inwards before heading right in a 90 degree angle to create the serif. The bowl on the left is pointing towards the bottom-left corner. The Bottom left of the line is the widest, slowly becoming smaller towards the top and becoming really thin at the bottom. The vertical right line becomes smaller about 4/5 of the way and angles left becoming really thin in the end. Connected to this is a big round finial, curling inwards.

The lowercase 'b'; The top serif is pointing left and is not connected to the very tip of the vertical ascender. It is connected a bit more down the asccender, giving it almost a flag like feeling. The serif is thinner towards the end and has a rounded tip. The round bowl on the right side of the vertical stroke is connected to the bottom of the ascender. Going right and down at first, becoming smaller, before going up and right and widening. It is widest on the top part of the vertical part of the line. This part is the widest line of the whole lowercase 'b'. From there it goes up and left, and down again becoming smaller and smaller. On the bottom left corner of the ascender, opposite to the bottom of the bulge, a small serif is connected. It heads down and left, and looks more like a rounded knob. And only barely visible.

The ligature between the lowercase 'c' and the 't', is typical for the rest of the font. A thin curved line leaves the top of the 'c', just left of the serif on the top right of the 'c'. It ascends in a curve, curving left bending just over the center of the 'c', and then going up and right. It goes over the t, and is connected to the right side of the top vertical line of the 't'. Maintaining the same stroke throughout.

The lowercase 'd' has distinctive serifs attached to the vertical stroke. The top serif points left and the bottom one right. Sounds normal for a serif type, except that these are no ordinairy serifs. The top one isn't connected to the end of the ascender, but reaches left a little under. This makes the horizontal top of the ascender going down and left, making it diagonal. But it isn't a straight line, the line connecting the top right corner of the ascender and the top left corner of the serif is bend, slightly, going down at first before slowly going left at first, and ending in an almost horizontal line. The corners of the serif are rounded of, making for an almost round end to the serif. The right-top corner of the ascender, which is connected to the serif by the bend line, is also rounded, and leans right, as if giving contra weight to hold the serif. The bottom serif, the one that points right is exactly the same, only mirrored.

The bottom side of the middle horizontal line of the lowercase 'e' is straight and perfectly horizontal, but the top side is straight and slightly askew. The right end is connected to the curve of the 'e' a little higher than the left side. The horizontal line is a fraction higher than the middle of the x-height. To the right of that horizontal line the curved line begins very wide, curving up and left, decreasing in width. Until it reaches the x-height, from where it curves left and down, increasing in width again. It is widest in the left bottom corner, from where it starts curving right and down. So the point where the left side of the curved line starts curving right is not in the middle, but 2/3 down the x-height. The curved line ends in a small rounded tip, slightly left of where the horizontal line extends right.

The ligature between the lowercase 'f' and the 't' is created by connecting the finial on the top end of the 'f' to the top part of the ascender of the 't'. The 'f' is leaning right and it looks like it does so to try to grab or eat the 't'. Or almost as if the 'f' is reaching down and right to try and pick up the 't'. In the ligature, the right side of the cross stroke of the 'f' is lost, leaving only the left side sticking out of the vertical stroke. But the full cross stroke of the 't' is maintained. Otherwise the cross-strokes would have been connected. The finial of the 'f' is also still maintained, which is an almost perfect circle at the and of the arched top of the 'f'. The connection between the 'f' and the 't' is not smooth or rounded but both caracters maintain their original form.

The lowercase 'g' is a two story 'g'. The top bowl has a vertical stress, and the horizontal middle of the stroke is the broadest. The ear of the 'g' is connected to the top bowl, slightly right of the middle of the top. It extends right and down. The finial on the end of the ear is like a ball balancing on top of the vertical line of the ear. The horizontal line is bending slightly down at the end, as if the weight of the ball, that is the final, is pushing down on it. Where the bottom line of the ear is connected to the bowl, there is not a sharp corner, but the point of the corner is rounded of. As if it is one line, going left towards the bowl before turning down to continue making the right side of the top bowl. The bottom bowl of te 'g' is wider and shorter than the top one. The stress is not vertical, but slightly tilted left. The bridge is connected across from where the ear is connected to the top bowl. So slightly left of the middle of the bottom of the top bowl.

The lowercase 'h' has a serif connected to the top of the ascender, pointing right. And two serifs connected to the two vertical strokes on the bottom. These serifs are identical and they both reach left and right. The horizontal line, making the bottom of the stroke and the serif isn't a straight line. It is curved, curving slightly up and inwards. As is the left and right ends of the serif are hanging down a little bit. The serif is flat and wide. The end is rounded of, and slightly wider than the part of the serif connecting to the bracket. The shoulder of the 'h' is connected to the ascender slightly under the x-height. But from there it heads right and up, the highest point reaching the x-height, which is approximatly two thirds up the ascender.

The dot floating above the lowercase 'i' is a perfect circle. It's diameter is the same width as the vertical stroke. And it floats a little under the ascender height. The dot isn't placed directly above the vertical stroke, but slightly right. The serif on top of that stroke points left, and slightly buldges right as well. But the dot is even more right than the small buldge on the right of the vertical stroke that makes the body of the 'i'.

The descender of the lowercase 'j' ends in a tail with a finial at the end. The right side of the vertical stroke is perfectly vertical until it reaches the baseline, from there it curves left and down in a smooth line. At first it is almost vertical but it bends more towards the end, before spiralling a little up again just before the finial. The left side of vertical stroke isn't perfectly straight and vertical. It allready starts bending right halfway down the x-height.But only very minimal. After crossing the baseline it continues the direction in a straight line. It continues that way only just before touching the line that makes up the right side of the stroke, that is curving left. From there it makes a curve that goes left and up making the finial at the end of the tail.

The two diagonal strokes on the right side of the vertical stroke of the lowercase 'k', do not intersect at the same height as where they are connected to the vertical stroke that makes the ascender. The top diagonal stroke is horizontally connected to the vertical stroke. It heads right before bending upwards and right at almost 45 degrees. The stroke starts very thin, but ends in almost twice that width. Increasing in width from start to end at the same rate. The serif attached to the top of the stroke reaches up to the x-height. But it isn't perfectly horizontal, the left side is slightly higher than the right side. So it is more line with the diagonal stroke that it is attached to. The bottom diagonal stroke has the same width as the vertical stroke.But it isn't connected to that stroke, it is connected to the top diagonal stroke just after the bend where that heads up and right. The bottom diagonal stroke heads down and right in an almost 45 degree angle in a straight line that maintains the same width. And it ends more right than where the top stroke ends. The serif connected to the end is perfectly horizontal.

The ligature that connects the lowercase 's' to the lowercase 'l' is a small curved line. At first it follows the same curve that is started at the left side of the top serif of the 's'. It goes left and up before bending up and right. At it’s top it is the same height as the ascender of the 'l'. But after it reaches he heighest point it curves right and down in a straight line, connecting to the 'l' just under the top of the 'l'. The ascender of the 'l' doesn’t end in a serf, but in a small finial at the top right corner of the ascender. This makes it look as if the stroke of the ascender makes a small curve at the end, curving right and bending in a small curve left. It creates the illusion that it continues in the small line of the ligature. Making it a continuing line, starting at the top of the 's', in a small line, curving left before going right and making a small curve going up and left continuing in the vertical stroke of the ascender of the 'l'. It remains the same width troughout the ligature and becomes wide only after it crosses the ascender of the 'l'.

The two shoulders of the lowercase 'm' reach just a fraction over the x-height. The vertical stroke on the left ends in a serif that does reach to the x-height, so it is just a fraction shorter as the two shoulders. The stroke that makes the first shoulder is connected to the the vertical stroke just under the top serif. It starts thin, increasing in width at a steady rate. It goes up and right, curving down and right just after it reaches a little higher than the x-height. It becomes a straight vertical line when the shoulder reaches the same height as it started. At the point where it starts becoming a straight vertical line, it has reached the same width as the left vertical stroke. And it ends in the same serif that the left vertical serif ends in. The right shoulder of the 'm' is a copy of the first shoulder, only not connected to the left vertical line, but to the first shoulder.

The lowercase 'o' is the same as the x-height, but not a perfect circle, it is a lot less wide than it is high. The stroke is widest where it is horizontal. Reaching it's thickest point at the horizontal middle. This makes the stress perfectly vertical since it is perfectly symmetrical. The negative space inside the 'o', that makes the counter, has to almost vertical straight lines at both sides. They are just slightly curved, this makes the strokes thick a the horizontal middle.

The bowl of the lowercase 'p' is exactly the x-height. A small stroke is connected right and just under the top serif of the vertical stroke. From there it bends right and up, increasing in width. When the shoulder reaches the x-height, it bends right and down, still increasing in size. It reaches the same width as the vertical stroke about 1/3 down the x-height. From there it decreases in width and bending inwards and down. It reaches it's thinnest point at the baseline. From there it goes up and left. That last upwards part it increases in width again before connecting to the vertical stroke. The top connection of the bowl is further down the vertical stroke, than the bottom connection is away from the baseline. The thinnest point of the bowl, where it touches the baseline, is slightly more left than where the top part of the shoulder touches the x-height. This makes it appear as if the bowl is under a 10 degree angle.

The vertical descender of the lowercase 'q', ends on the top side just under the x-height. This is because it doesn't have a serif attached to it, like for example the lowercase 'p' has. But it ends in a small spur, a little rounded of extensions attached to the top-right corner of the vertical stroke. It extends right and up, in a small wave -like curve. The bowl of the lowercase 'q' is different from the bowl of the lowercase 'p', because it is upside down. The stroke that makes the bowl of the lowercase 'p' is thinnest at the top connection of the bowl and the vertical stroke. And it gets wider at the vertical part and then thinner again at the bottom, before becoming thicker again as it makes the bottom connection to the vertical stroke. But with the lowercase 'q', this is the other way round. It is thinnest at the bottom connection and wider at the top one. So not only is it attached to the left side of the vertical stroke, whereas the bowl of the lowercase 'p' is attached to the right side of the vertical stroke, it is also upside down. Flipped horizontally and vertically.

The ear of the lowercase 'r' ends in a big round finial. The ear starts as a thin stroke, beginning on the right side of the vertical stroke, just under where the serif is connected to the top of that stroke. It extends right and up under a 45 degree angle. The bottom side of that stroke is straight, while the top side is already a little bit curving, already anticipating the bowl that makes the big finial at the end. The this stroke starts thin and increases in width immediately. As the top part reaches the x-height, it starts curving downwards and right, making the top of the finial. The bottom side already starts curving downwards a little left from where to top side meets the x-height. First the bottom side makes a sharp turn donwards, slowly curving more left to create the bottom side of the almost perfectly round finial connected to the end. The bottom of the finial reaches almost down to the same height as where the stroke of the ear connectes to the vertical stroke.

The ligature between the lowercase 's' and the lowercase 't' is a thin curved line, connecting the top serif of the lowercase 's' to the top vertical terminal of the lowerase 't'. The top spur of the top serif of the lowercase 's' isn't a spur but continues in the line making up the ligature. That line is the same width as the serif at first, but as it curves up, it decreases in width. This is because the left side of the stroke curves more left than the bottom side. That curves a little more up as the top side, making it become thinner. It is thinnest at the left top corner. As the line curves right, it increases in width a litlle, before curving down again and decreasing in width to adjust to the width of the lowercase 't'. The curve of the ligature isn't symmetrical, the left side is more curving right, while the right side is almost vertically going down towards the 't'. The curve is even going a little left again at the bottom right side, as the top side is extending a little over the right side of the top terminal of the lowercase 't'.

The serifs on the top of the two vertical strokes of the lowercase 'u' are different from other serifs in DTL Fleischmann. Because all the other serifs in the type are not straight on top, but are slightly curved. But these serifs on the lowercase 'u', do have straight horizontal top lines. Only the left one is slightly curved, but less than other serifs in this type. The two serif are connected to the left sides of the vertical strokes. The right top corners of these serifs and vertical strokes have a 90 degree angle and are just slightly rounded of. Only the corner of the right stroke is more than 90 degrees because the top side is not completele horizontal but just slightly askew.The left bottom corners of the serifs, where they meet the vertical strokes are rounded of more, but also have a 90 degree angle. The two vertical strokes that make up the lowercase 'u' are straight and have the same stroke width. The left one starts curving right 3/4 of the way down. When the line starts curving it also decreases in width. When it reaches the baseline, the bottom side of the stroke heads in a straight line up and right to connect to the right vertical stroke. The top side of the curved stroke is not straight however, it keeps curving towards the right stroke. And it connects to that stroke at the same height as where the left stroke starts curving right.

The left diagonal stroke of the lowercase 'v' has an even stroke width, and is four times as wide as the right diagonal stroke. The right one is thinner at the bottom and slightly wider at the top. The vertex on the bottom isn't symmetrical. The left side of the vertex is a straight line, continuing in a small curve that makes the tip. But the right side of the vertex has a small dent, before continuing in a straight diagonal line. The dent is as wide as the left diagonal stroke, and also at the end of that stroke. The dent becomes a straight line at the same height as where the thin right stroke extends from the broad right one. The serif at the end of the right diagonal stroke has a flat horizontal top, while the left serif has the caracteristic curved top like alsmost all serifs in the DTL Fleischmann.

The lowercase 'w' is actually two lowercase 'v's connected together. It is a lowercase 'v' with another one connected to the left side of it. But the left one misses the serif on top of the thin right diagonal stroke. Because that thin stroke is connected to the left side of the wide right stroke of the right 'v'. But it isn't connected to the top of that right stroke but 1/3 of the way down. Because of that the right thin stroke of the left 'v' is also only 2/3, because it intersects at that height with the right 'v'.

The lowercase 'x' is made up out of a thick diagonal stroke that has a 33 degree angle. Going from top left to bottom right. It has a serif connected to either end of it. That broad stroke is crossed in the middle by a thin diagonal stroke. That thin diagonal stroke has a slightly different angle. That creates the bottom serifs to stick out further than the top serifs. The thin diagonal stroke doesn't have an even stroke width but it is thinner in the middle and wider at the ends, where it attaches to the serifs.

The descender of the lowercase 'y' has a tail that curves left with a finial at the end. The right diagonal stroke is thin, and the left diagonal stroke is wide and continues in the tail. The left side of the left diagonal stroke is a straight line that starts curving left at the base-line. The right side of that stroke already starts curving 1/3 of the way of that stroke, making the tail thinner. The thin right diagonal stroke is connected to the left wide stroke a fraction above the base-line. The stroke begins thin and ends just a little bit wider at the top under the serif. The tail becomes wider again when it reaches the descender-height and curves left and up. The finial at the end is a big circle placed on top of the tail. The serif connected to the top of the wide diagonal left stroke extends a little left of where the finial ends.

The diagonal stroke of the lowercase 'z' runs from top left to bottom right and has an even width. The two horizontal strokes connected to the ends are thinner but also have an even stroke width. The serif on the left of the horizontal top stroke of the lowercase 'z' is not connected to the very tip of the stroke, but the wide serif is descending just before the exit of the thin line. Thus creating a serif with a kind of horizontal knob on the left edge of the top part. The contrast between the thin stroke and the in comparison wide serif is huge. The serif descends in angle towards the bottom left. It begins very wide and ends in about half of this width. The serif isn't a straight line, it curves slightly left. The left side of the serif is curved less than the right side, creating an asymmetrical end. The tip is rounded of in a wide curve. The serif on the bottom horizontal stroke is the same, only mirrored.

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